Conflict Prevention in the 21st Century: an evening with Noel Lateef and The Lafayette Club

While heavy rain poured outside on Thursday, 11 October, students and members of the Lafayette Club committee gathered in the society room of St Andrews’ Hotel du Vin Thursday evening to hear Noel Lateef speak on the importance of conflict prevention in the 21st century. Mr Lateef, longstanding president of the Foreign Policy Association basedContinue reading “Conflict Prevention in the 21st Century: an evening with Noel Lateef and The Lafayette Club”

From Russia…with Love? Beneath the Surface of the 2018 World Cup

Nothing possesses quite the same ability to simultaneously polarise and unite as the momentous sporting event that is the FIFA World Cup. It is that time again, when football addicts rejoice at spending an unhealthy amount of time shouting at an inanimate screen, while those indifferent suddenly decide that they are fascinated by tennis. ObsessiveContinue reading “From Russia…with Love? Beneath the Surface of the 2018 World Cup”

Paradise Lost: Leading “A Better Life” with Nestlé’s Peter Brabeck-Letmathe

On the cloudy evening of Monday 9th April, students gathered in the Hotel du Vin to listen intently as the Lafayette Club’s latest guest, the Chairman Emeritus and Former CEO of food giant Nestlé, enlightened us as to the ways in which his company plans to help each one of us to lead “a betterContinue reading “Paradise Lost: Leading “A Better Life” with Nestlé’s Peter Brabeck-Letmathe”

Review: “Hope to Nope: Graphics and Politics 2008-18” at the Design Museum, London

What can we learn about graphics, politics and human rights? Political graphics have long been attached to British and overseas politics, from early twentieth-century suffragette banners to the placards featured in last month’s Campaign Against Anti-Semitism protests at the Labour Party HQ in London. However, whilst they have traditionally been associated with states, corporations andContinue reading “Review: “Hope to Nope: Graphics and Politics 2008-18” at the Design Museum, London”

Review: Symposium X Children in Conflict

St Andrews UNICEF On Campus held its fourth annual Symposium on Monday 9 April in conjunction with the On The Rocks Festival. The nearly sold out event was held in the Byre’s top floor loft, extending an intimate feel to the event. The evening kicked off at 5:00 pm with a drinks reception, followed byContinue reading “Review: Symposium X Children in Conflict”

Approaching Day Zero of Cape Town’s Water Crisis in the Aftermath of Apartheid

The South African Apartheid, which systematically separated the black and white populations–was officially dismantled in 1991. Before the Apartheid, native South Africans underwent hundreds of years of subjugation under white imperialist countries, namely the Dutch and the British. Stemming from centuries-long white suppression, the end of the Apartheid did not succeed in accomplishing total equality;Continue reading “Approaching Day Zero of Cape Town’s Water Crisis in the Aftermath of Apartheid”

How Uzbekistan Used Western Fears of Islamism and Terrorism to its Advantage

With thousands of political prisoners, endemic torture in the prison system, and extremely restricted freedom of speech, Uzbekistan is hardly a model for human rights. Yet, President Karimov, who ruled the country from 1989 until his death in 2016, successfully played on Western fears of Islamism and terrorism and used them to his advantage. HeContinue reading “How Uzbekistan Used Western Fears of Islamism and Terrorism to its Advantage”

Fast Fashion and its Fatal Consequences in Bangladesh

This coming April will mark 5 years since the garment industry’s deadliest disaster: the collapse of the eight-story Rana Plaza factory building in Bangladesh. The tragedy, a consequence of cheap construction and heavy equipment, was entirely avoidable, yet took the lives of over 1,100 people and injured thousands more. It regrettably took a catastrophe ofContinue reading “Fast Fashion and its Fatal Consequences in Bangladesh”

Ahed Tamimi: A 17-year-old Symbol of Resistance?

In December 2017 a video was circulated online of Palestinian women hitting and kicking Israeli Defence Force (IDF) soldiers who were posted outside the women’s houses. The protagonist of this video is 17-year-old Ahed Tamimi, who is currently detained in custody until her trial on March 11th. If found guilty, Tamimi could face up toContinue reading “Ahed Tamimi: A 17-year-old Symbol of Resistance?”

Bottling It Up: The Voiceless Right to Water

It can seem as though there’s no escaping from water. After all, it covers over 2/3 of the surface of the planet, and comprises 60% of the human body. It boils freely in pan and kettle, and runs instantaneously at the twist of a tap. It fills lochs and lakes, and rushes in streams orContinue reading “Bottling It Up: The Voiceless Right to Water”