Famine, War, and Disease: Why South Sudan Cannot Catch a Break

Ever since its independence from Sudan in 2011, the newly formed state of South Sudan has faced social, political and economic instability despite the efforts of countless forms of humanitarian aid and support. Earlier this year, the United Nations declared famine in parts of war-torn South Sudan where around 100,000 people face starvation and millionsContinue reading “Famine, War, and Disease: Why South Sudan Cannot Catch a Break”

Crushed Spirit but Reinvigorated People: How One Man’s Death Reignited the Voice of a Nation

On October 28th, the small ocean-side city of Al-Hoceima was shaken by the death of Moroccan fish salesman Mouhcine Fikri. Although the fishing, possession, and dissemination of swordfish after autumn is illegal in Morocco, Fikri had managed to acquire 500 kg (1,000 lbs) worth, estimated to be valued at $11,000, and, following a desperate attemptContinue reading “Crushed Spirit but Reinvigorated People: How One Man’s Death Reignited the Voice of a Nation”

A Crisis of Faith: The International Criminal Court in Africa

On October 20th 2016, South Africa became the second African nation to publicly withdraw from the International Criminal Court, as Foreign Minister Maite Nkoana-Mashabane made the country’s formal notification to the United Nations Secretary General, Ban Ki-Moon. South Africa follows in the footsteps of Burundi as tensions have risen surrounding the nature of the court,Continue reading “A Crisis of Faith: The International Criminal Court in Africa”

Nigeria and the Unspoken Effects of Boko Haram

In Nigeria, “nine million people need emergency relief; 4.5 million people are severely food insecure; [and] 2.5 million people have been forced from their homes,” according to the United Nations (UN). UNICEF stated that “an estimated 244,000 children faced severe malnourishment in Borno State alone and warn[ed] that an estimated 49,000 – one in fiveContinue reading “Nigeria and the Unspoken Effects of Boko Haram”

Summer Series: After Ebola: Sustainable Agriculture in Sierra Leone

Planting potato vines in raised rows. Using new tools to turn the soil. Planting peppers in a nursery, shaded by palm fronds, before transplanting them. Spreading quality fertilizer. These are not new or revolutionary techniques. However, they have the ability to make a huge impact on a farmer’s yields. My name is Emma Middleton andContinue reading “Summer Series: After Ebola: Sustainable Agriculture in Sierra Leone”

Summer Series: Writing Wrongs – The language of aid, development and neo-colonialism

She was a “white Muzungu with long angel hair” who fell in love with a German pilot, singlehandedly started a school for HIV-positive children, and managed to survive a vicious attack on her host village from genocidaires connected to the Hutu-Tutsi conflicts of the 1990s. At least, that’s the story Louise Linton tells in herContinue reading “Summer Series: Writing Wrongs – The language of aid, development and neo-colonialism”

Uganda: Stable State, Unstable Politics

After years of oppression and civil war following independence, Uganda’s relative security means it has a generally positive – if sometimes controversial – image on the world stage. Considered one of the continent’s more prosperous states, it is the seventeenth-largest economy in Africa, and it continues to grow; furthermore, travel and tourism rates consistently risingContinue reading “Uganda: Stable State, Unstable Politics”

Peacekeeper Babies: Sexual Abuse by UN Peacekeepers in the Central African Republic

In UN circles, they are called ‘peacekeeper babies’. They are the infants inevitably born to local women after the UN has deployed troops to regions in turmoil, and the ages of these children map the dates and direction of operations in some of the most vulnerable parts of the world. In the Central African Republic,Continue reading “Peacekeeper Babies: Sexual Abuse by UN Peacekeepers in the Central African Republic”

It’s Not Over Yet: The Economic Impact of Ebola in Sierra Leone

A woman working in a field in Sierra Leone An outbreak of the Ebola Virus Disease in West Africa that began in 2014 and has continued to the present day has rocked the world. Over 9,700 people have died and almost 24,000 have been infected since the beginning of the outbreak, mainly in Liberia, Guinea,Continue reading “It’s Not Over Yet: The Economic Impact of Ebola in Sierra Leone”

Ghana’s Prayer Camps

Facing a chronic shortage of appropriate medical care, the families of disabled people in Ghana are resorting to ‘prayer camps’. With just 3 public psychiatric hospitals and 12 practising psychiatrists across the whole country, according to Integrated Regional Information Networks (IRIN), families have resorted to sending their disabled relatives to ‘prayer camps’ run by privateContinue reading “Ghana’s Prayer Camps”